Colorectal Cancer What Your Patients Need To Know

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9 hours ago Screening for colorectal cancer with a colonoscopy and, if needed, a biopsy can determine if the patient has colon cancer. Patients may also be asked to take a Cologuard test that detects trace

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5 hours ago The earlier you seek medical care, the better. Dr. Schnoll-Sussman: The most important thing to learn from this tragedy is that colorectal cancer is not a disease limited to older people. There is no age or gender or …

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4 hours ago Learn about causes & risk factors for colorectal cancer, screening tests to help prevent it, & changes in diet and physical activity to help lower your risk. Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Know the signs and symptoms of …

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8 hours ago Colorectal cancer screening saves lives. Screening can find precancerous polyps—abnormal growths in the colon or rectum—that can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screening also helps find colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment works best. About nine out of every 10 people whose colorectal cancers are found early and

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8 hours ago The American Cancer Society (ACS) reports that about 1 in 23 males and 1 in 25 females will grow colorectal cancer during their lifetime. Your doctor can use staging as a guideline to find out how far cancer has gone. Your doctor needs to know the stage of cancer.

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7 hours ago A family history of colon cancer. Foods that are high in fat, or high amounts of red meat, such as beef. Foods that are low in fiber, or not enough fruits and vegetables. Lack of physical activity. Cigarette smoking or heavy alcohol use. Medical conditions such as diabetes or obesity. Exposure to chemicals, such as asbestos.

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3 hours ago Colorectal cancer is more likely to occur, as people get older. This disease is more common in people over the age of 50. However, colorectal cancer can occur at younger ages, even, in rare cases, in the teens. Diet. Colorectal cancer seems to be associated with diets that are high in fat and calories and low in fiber. Researchers are exploring

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7 hours ago Even though colorectal cancer is often highly treatable, the diagnosis can be a major ordeal for Millennials and Generation Xers, who range in age from their mid-20s to their late 50s. It can interrupt careers and damage …

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5 hours ago 2. Chat with a Colorectal Cancer Alliance navigator. A patient navigator from the Colorectal Cancer Alliance will reach out to ask you questions to make sure this test is right for you. 3. Do the test. Most people will be eligible for a simple, at-home test called a Fecal Immunochemical test (FIT). This test checks for blood in your stool.

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9 hours ago Diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer The colorectal cancer journey is different for everyone, there is no single road map to follow. Whether you just received a diagnosis, or you are a caregiver, these tips will help you through. 1. Learn as much as you can about your diagnosis. • The Colorectal Cancer Alliance provides information and education

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Just Now Colorectal cancer starts in the colon or rectum, also known as the large intestine. As colorectal cancer grows and spreads, it may enter the lymphatic system (the immune system’s transportation system) and spread throughout the whole body. This process is called metastasis. There are five stages of colorectal cancer, and each is slightly

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8 hours ago Colorectal cancer, or cancer of the colon or rectum, is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Each year, it claims more than 53,500 lives. An estimated 145,000 men and women will be diagnosed with colon cancer this year alone. However, colon and rectal cancer can often be prevented with proper screening.

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4 hours ago Many patients don’t recognize or simply dismiss the symptoms that may signal colorectal cancer, You says. Colorectal cancer symptoms can include: Rectal bleeding with or without pain. Blood in the stool or toilet with or after a bowel movement. A change in bowel pattern, such as increased diarrhea or constipation.

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6 hours ago What You Need to Know About Colorectal Cancer. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. In 2022, approximately 106,180 people will be diagnosed with colon cancer and 44,850 with rectal cancer, according to estimates from the American Cancer Society.

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4 hours ago Colorectal cancer is commonly known as colon and rectal cancer. This type of cancer is characterized by an abnormal growth of cells in the inner lining of the large intestine or rectum, also known as polyps. There are several types of polyps, but adenomatous polyps and sessile serrated polyps are the polyp types often associated with increased

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1 hours ago Keep in mind that the best way to prevent colon cancer is to keep active, eat a balanced diet, maintain your ideal body weight, and schedule polyp screenings regularly after age 50, or earlier if

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6 hours ago There can also be a genetic cause of colorectal cancer for about 5-10% of colorectal cancer patients. If someone in your immediate family has been diagnosed, especially if they were diagnosed before the age of 45, you may want to talk to one of our cancer experts about a Genetic Risk Assessment. Knowing whether there are genetic changes present

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the life expectancy of someone with colon cancer?

How long will a person with stage 4 colon cancer live?

  • Diagnosis. A doctor may recommend multiple tests to accurately diagnose colon cancer. ...
  • Decisions. Anyone who receives a stage 4 colon cancer diagnosis will have to make some decisions about the way forward, particularly regarding treatment options.
  • Treatment options. ...
  • Outlook. ...
  • Summary. ...

When should you start getting screened for colorectal cancer?

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force), an independent, volunteer panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine, now recommends that screenings for colorectal cancer start at age 45, as compared to the prior recommendation of age 50.

What is the best treatment for colon cancer?

Your specific colon resection strategy will depend on many factors, including the following:

  • The location of the tumor
  • The presence of other cancers or polyps
  • The stage of the cancer
  • The risk of developing colon cancer in the future
  • Your preferences

What are the warning signs of colon cancer?

When signs and symptoms do occur, the following are some of the most typical signs of colon cancer:

  • A persistent change in bowel habits
  • Narrow or pencil-thin stools
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Blood in the stool, rectal bleeding (blood may appear as bright red blood or dark stools)
  • Persistent abdominal pain or discomfort, such as cramps or bloating
  • A feeling that your bowel doesn't empty completely
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Fatigue, tiredness, or weakness

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